What is Home Equity?

As costs increase and the economy teeters in the balance, many folks are starting to take a hard look at their financial situations and ensuring they are in a healthy position for any potential storms that might come their way. This can include a recession, a job loss, etc. In truth, this is a healthy practice and should be done regularly.When it comes to assets, there is usually none bigger for homeowners than their property. If positioned well, your home holds equity which can be leveraged in many ways.

Equity is the balance between the debt that you still owe against your property and the current market value of the home. As you pay down your mortgage, for example, your equity grows. Equity also grows if the real estate market around you grows. Once your mortgage is paid off, you own 100% of the property and have 100% equity.

Why is Equity Important?

Equity is one of the greatest benefits to owning a property. It’s a primary investment tool and once you have a good amount of equity, it can be leveraged in several different ways. For instance, it can be used as buying power towards a new home if you plan to move or downsize in your retirement. You can also borrow against the equity that you’ve built via a home equity loan. These loans can be used for many things, including college tuition payments, consolidating credit card debt, making improvements to your home, paying medical bills, buying a car, etc.

How Quickly Can You Access It?

A home equity loan can move quickly assuming there are no issues with credit, payment history on your mortgage and market value. Once you have that loan in place, you can start using it right away. In fact, it’s possible to sign up for a home equity line of credit before you ever need it as an emergency cash backup so that you don’t have to run through the administrative process during a time of need.

You can also access the equity in your home by refinancing it. A ‘cash out’ refinance essentially allows you to get a check at the closing of your refinance. How much you can get is based on how much equity is in your home, and what your new monthly mortgage payment would be based on the terms of the loan and what the bank believes you are able to afford monthly.

As with any financial decision, it’s imperative to have a competent team of professionals to help guide you in your decision making. A lender, accountant and/or investment professional would be good places to start if you need cash.

Principle Abstract and Settlement Services has years of experience guiding clients through purchases and refinances. We also hold close professional relationships with some of the very best industry professionals in the Bucks and Montgomery County areas. If you are interested in refinancing or learning more about how to tap into your home’s value, give our office a call and a member of our team can assist you.

What To Do If a Co-Owner Sells Your Home

From time to time, relationships can break down with folks who you own significant property with, such as a spouse, partner, or siblings once an estate is inherited. It’s an unfortunate reality between co-owners, but it happens all the time, and real estate can get caught up in the fray.

When a deed has multiple owners listed, it requires that each party sign paperwork in order to legally transfer the deed to someone else. However, that doesn’t stop people from trying.

In the example of a divorce, real estate is often the biggest asset between the couple. During arbitration and/or court proceedings, it is typically decided that the real estate at hand is transferred to one of the individuals as part of the agreement, or both individuals agree to sell it together with proceeds to be distributed however it is agreed upon.

Again, that doesn’t mean that people try to bypass the process. Through forgery or other means, a partner, ex spouse, etc., may get away with selling the property before anyone catches on. As a victim, you are now faced with a co-owner who has all the proceeds from the sale, and someone else who now has a claim to the property itself.

How Title Insurance Helps

Title insurance helps in these situations. By having a title policy in place, the buyer who unknowingly bought the property will be made whole again and the co-owner who illegally sold the home will be sought after by the title company. You will then get the property back. With a title insurance policy in force, this is all handled with little to no legal complexity or heavy lift on your part.

How a Title Search Helps

A title search is typically performed before a property sale and before a title insurance policy is issued. Most title searches would catch this type of malfeasance, but there’s always the chance that things slip through the cracks.

What Happens If There Isn’t Title Insurance?

Not having a title insurance policy to lean on in these situations doesn’t mean you no longer have a legal claim to the property or proceeds at hand. However, it does make things much more complicated. At this point, your only recourse would be complex, expensive and often drawn-out legal action involving multiple parties (the co-owner, the buyer of the property, and yourself.) If you are OK with letting the buyer keep the home, it could be less complicated as you’re now only looking to claim your share of the proceeds from the co-owner. If you do want to property back, it will be much more involved.

With any real estate transaction, it is strongly advised that you seek professional guidance and consider a title insurance policy on your home. These policies are largely inexpensive considering the cost of other types of insurance, but the impact can be huge should you ever need it.

Again, a title search will very likely catch these types of issues, however, that is the purpose of insurance: You put policies in force (such as fire, flood, auto, life, etc.) with the hopes that you never need to use it. Like, any other event or loss, the financial and emotional cost of not having a policy in place can be devastating.

Principle Abstract and Settlement Services has years of experience performing robust title searches and protecting buyers from any issues that might come up.

Looking to buy a home? If so, contact our office and a member of our team will be happy to assist you.

What is an Independent Title Insurance Company?

A real estate transaction can overwhelm many buyers, particularly first-time homebuyers who have not been through the process before. There are many people, a ton of paperwork and, of course, significant money involved. With so many people pushing towards the closing, it can be tempting to step back and let the wheels turn on their own.

If a particular real estate transaction represents your single biggest expense, you can’t afford to blink during the homebuying process and you must be as big an advocate for yourself possible.

Title insurance represents one of those areas where you can advocate for yourself. Many national real estate brokerages provide their own title service in house and many agents push buyers into using their services. This makes complete sense for several reasons:

  1. They are familiar with the process and want a transaction process to be as predictable as possible
  2. They make more money for their brokerage
  3. The title service is invested in the success of the brokerage and the agent
  4. It’s simply easier for them

There is nothing wrong or unsavory with any of the above listed reasons for going with an in-house agency. That being said, homebuyers have the freedom to shop for and engage with an independent title insurance provider.

Independent Title Insurance Providers Are Impartial

Choosing an independent title insurance provider brings in a completely impartial entity to the closing. Their goal is a successful real estate transaction for both parties without the burdens of quotas, corporate mandates, etc.

Often, independent title insurance agents provide their services at a lower cost to the homebuyer, potentially saving hundreds of dollars that becomes even more costly once rolled into the total cost of your mortgage.

Principle Abstract and Settlement Services prides itself on providing robust, professional, and courteous title and settlement services to every real estate transaction. We work to ensure that each transaction runs smoothly and for the benefit of all involved, not just the brokerage.

Interested in learning more about our services and how we can help with your next real estate transaction? Give us a call today and a member of our team will be happy to speak to you.

How to Avoid a Delayed Closing

The purchase of a home becomes much more real after an offer has been accepted. It’s at this point where a lot of the gears involved in a real estate transaction begins to turn. From appraisals and home inspections to title searches and financial considerations, there is a lot to get done in short order. It also means that things can go awry and a delayed closing becomes a possibility.

Some minor issues can cause little to no delays. Other issues can stop the process entirely and cause weeks or perhaps even indefinite delays. For example, if a buyer has already sold their existing home, a delayed closing can essentially put them in a state of homelessness. With new jobs, school, moving trucks and furniture/appliance deliveries all lined up, a delayed closing can be both emotionally and financially taxing.

We’ve identified several issues any buyer should keep an eye on which can cause delays. The sooner they are spotted and handled, the faster a closing can get back on course.

Financial Issues          

Most homebuyers require financing to buy a house. It is up to the buyer to ensure that little to nothing changes with their financial picture between a pre-approval and the date of closing. Income sources should remain intact, and large purchases where additional financing is required, such as a car, should wait. These types of changes can throw off the calculations that lenders use to determine your ability to pay them back, and a bank can pull their offer to extend a loan as a result.

Be up front with your loan officer and ensure that your proverbial house is in order. Ensure there are no back taxes, past due child support payments, etc. which might trigger a lien on your income. If something changes with your job status or overall financial picture, ensure you reach out immediately to explain the situation to avoid a delayed closing.

Appraisals

A significant step in any real estate transaction is the appraisal, which determines the value of the property at hand. Issues can sometimes arise when an appraisal comes in lower than the agreed upon purchase price. This is because lenders work with the appraised value, not the purchase price. Any number beyond the appraised value needs to be negotiated between the buyer and seller, which can add complexity to a closing.

Inspections

Inspections are performed for the benefit of the homebuyer to ensure that the home is in livable condition and does not have any health or safety concerns, such as structural damage, electrical/mechanical issues, mold, etc.

Inspections can reveal significant issues which need to be negotiated between the buyer and seller. In extreme cases, issues like mold, structural issues or roofing repairs can take weeks, if not months, to sort out.

Title Issues

Any real estate transaction should have a comprehensive title search performed. This process will ensure that there is a clear title on the home and that there are no liens, tax issues or claims against a property which might delay the transaction from taking place.

Along with a survey, the title search can also reveal any easements or other issues which might cause a delayed closing

Home sale contingency

A common contingency in a residential real estate transaction is an escape clause for the buyer should the sale of their current home fall through for any reason. These are often used as the buyer needs the proceeds from the sale of their house to close on the new home, or they simply cannot cover the cost of two mortgages.

The buyer’s ability to navigate their home sale is critical in these transactions – any delay can put the new home purchase on hold. As an aside, for properties with multiple offers, a seller can look for offers with these types of agreements and choose to avoid them. Any ability to remove this requirement from your offer will help to avoid delays and make your offer more attractive to sellers.

Final Walk Through

A final walkthrough is performed by the real estate agent and the buyer, typically the day prior to or the day of closing. The purpose is to confirm that agreed upon repairs have been performed and that the home is as expected.

This also creates an opportunity for delays. For instance, the seller may have agreed to certain repairs based on the home inspection and didn’t do them. Or, they may have specified that all kitchen appliances would stay in the home but they are now gone.

If you experience a delay in a home purchase, don’t be too alarmed. Indeed, about 25% of all real estate transactions experience some sort of delay. The best thing any buyer can do is to stay involved in the process, communicate often, do their part to smooth out any potentially bumps in the road and to be mentally prepared for delays.

Principle Abstract works tirelessly for homebuyers to ensure that their purchase is in order and that any threats to a timely transaction and is properly communicated and handled. Trusted by dozens of area agents and lenders, Principle Abstract prides itself on our attention to detail and ability to navigate any title issue at hand.

For more information or to get started on a real estate transaction, contact us today.

What are Deed Restrictions?

Title searches can often unearth deed restrictions that are placed on a property. Also known as restrictive covenants, deed restrictions are one of the more interesting topics when it comes to real estate. They’re pre-adopted rules baked into the deed that the owner of the property must follow and adhere to. These restrictions are legally binding and can include:

  1. The payment of dues, homeowners’ association fees or the like.
  2. What color the dwelling can be.
  3. How the property can be landscaped.
  4. How the property can be used (for example, where visitors can park, fencing, decoration, garden beds, etc.)
  5. What types and size pets the owner can have.

For example, unknowing homeowners may assume that certain maintenance, such as street lighting, is handled through property taxes. They might also assume that they can adopt a large breed dog. They may also make considerable investments to the home, such as painting, only to be forced to revert to an original color or to a color from a pre-approved palette. If the homeowner requires a space to park a project car or an RV, for instance, these restrictions can be devastating. These owners may soon be surprised with a bill for dues a fine and/or a cease-and-desist order for not abiding by the deed restrictions placed on their property.

The same can be true for buyers looking to buy an empty plot. In this case, deed restrictions can include how big of a home can be built, how many garages or outbuildings can be erected (and their size,) or the ability to install a pool.

Of course, many deed restrictions are obvious, especially if the property at hand is in a planned community, such as an adult living development or community that might maintain a clubhouse, tennis courts and/or pools. They may also handle upkeep like landscaping and snow removal. These types of communities almost always have an HOA and their associated dues and are often seen (and positioned as) a benefit to living there. Indeed, deed restrictions are intended to increase and maintain property values in the area.

The issue comes when they are unexpected and prevent a buyer from using the property as they intended.

That is where a thorough title search comes in. Any deed restrictions will come to light during a title search, whether they are in place and enforced by an HOA, a municipality, etc. This will protect a buyer from purchasing a home that they won’t be able to use as intended or be responsible for costs they were unaware of.

Principle Abstract has years of experience performing comprehensive title searches for homebuyers. If there are deed restrictions attached to a property they will be uncovered and disclosed, ensuring our clients aren’t blindsided after their purchase.

Interested in purchasing a home? Give our office a call and a member of our team can assist you.

Title Insurance for the Cannabis Industry in Pennsylvania

The Cannabis industry is rapidly growing and there is significant interest from both the private and public sectors to move things forward. For the former, it’s a business opportunity to take advantage of growing demand for cannabis-based products. For the latter, the potential tax revenue that can be collected by those private enterprises is attractive.

Since there is no federal law providing blanket legal standards, we are left with individual state laws and regulations on how cannabis can be grown, sold, etc. Some states are further along than others in working through the proverbial ‘red tape.’ Others, like Pennsylvania, are one of those states that are still figuring things out.

Title insurance has certainly been caught in the fray.

As a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, it is a federal crime to possess, use, sell, or distribute marijuana. Therefore, handling funds or settling financial transactions for cannabis-related businesses could be considered assisting in unlawful activity. This also presents numerous risks of insuring and transferring real property that is associated with unlawful activity, including, for example, the potential to implicate anti-money laundering rules as well as forfeiture laws.

For these reasons, title insurance has been difficult if not impossible to get in states like Pennsylvania, which means that buyers would need to perform their own due diligence on a property and assemble a specialized team of consultants and legal experts to navigate the transaction.

In Pennsylvania, a major change has now made it easier and Principle Abstract has taken a position of leadership when it comes to cannabis related real estate transactions.

Getting Title Insurance for Cannabis Related Businesses in PA is Possible

Until recently, buyers have typically not been able to obtain owner’s policies as most title companies have not been willing to provide coverage options. Principle Abstract has developed relationships with several organizations that now make this possible.

Furthermore, lenders were typically unable to obtain loan policies. However, our office has now been able to successfully offer and close transactions for cannabis companies.

We’ve also been able to develop a solution that allows us to act as escrow agents in a cannabis related real estate transactions in Pennsylvania.

By combining these unique solutions, Principle Abstract is uniquely positioned to assist in most if not all cannabis related transactions throughout the state of Pennsylvania and are now offering consultations to anyone seeking title and escrow support on a transaction.

Additionally, we are members of The Pennsylvania Cannabis Coalition (PCC), a 501(c)6 trade organization comprised of Pennsylvania medical marijuana permit holders. Through our membership with PCC, we can help to advance the progress of the cannabis industry within the state of PA.

More on the Coalition:

Our purpose is to protect and preserve Pennsylvania’s emerging marijuana market.  We help devise policy that regulates the sensible cultivation, distribution, and use of cannabis. We represent the current medical cannabis industry here in Pennsylvania. We advocate for a robust yet economically sensible regulatory framework. We continue to educate elected officials, regulators, and the general public about of the need and benefits of cannabis-derived therapies. Our team includes both industry and public affairs specialists with rich, domain-specific experience at the local, state, and federal level.

Are you currently involved in a commercial real estate transaction for an entity operating within the cannabis industry? Give Principle Abstract a call today and a member of our team will be happy to offer a consultation.

The Who’s Who at the Closing Table

A closing is the culmination of a whole lot of work involving multiple parties over the course of several months in most instances. Between the real estate professionals, title agencies, lawyers, etc., people often ask who actually shows up at the closing table for a real estate transaction. There are some folks who one can bet will be there for nearly every transaction. Others involved in the transaction may be there but are not required.

In our latest blog, we list the people who have a seat at the closing table when a closing takes place.

Buyers

It’s no surprise that buyers will be at the closing. After all, they are the ones signing all the paperwork and taking possession of the property at hand. Their identities are always confirmed at the time of the closing to ensure they are indeed the appropriate party signing the documentation. That said, proxies can be assigned during real estate transactions, and that is handled well before the day of the closing.

The Buyers Agent

The buyer’s agent is almost always at a closing. They represented the buyers throughout the process and it’s their job to ensure that the buyer’s best interests are met at the time of the closing. Once the transaction is finalized at the closing, their job is done.

The Listing Agent

The listing agent who helped the sellers with their real estate sale will be at the closing. The listing agent ensures that their client’s best interests are met and that the transaction settles smoothly and as expected. At this point in time, they are paid their commission for their part in selling the property.

Escrow Officer

The escrow officer is an employee/representative of the title agency involved in the real estate transaction. They have helped to manage all the paperwork leading up the closing and are responsible for a smooth transaction. This includes ensuring that all parties are aware of each step of the process, what each party is signing, and ensuring that each document is properly executed and recorded.

Those Less Likely to Attend

The Sellers

The Sellers may be present at a closing, although their interests are already being represented by their agent, as mentioned above. Often, a seller may not be in the area to make a closing, having already moved out of the property they are selling. Alternatively, they might live far away but are representing an estate that they are tasked with settling, An example would be an individual selling their parent’s home after they’ve passed away.

Mortgage Broker

A mortgage broker is not often present at the closing, although there are a few reasons why they may want to show. This can include a settlement which was particularly difficult to negotiate, or to simply meet/see the parties at the closing. Ultimately, however, they have no specific role at the time of the closing and most questions or issues involving the transaction at hand would have been handled before the closing was confirmed.

Legal Representative

A representative from a law firm involved in the transaction may be present under specific circumstances. Their likelihood of being at the closing table increase if the transaction at hand includes a trust, if a probate court is involved in any way, etc. Otherwise, don’t anticipate the presence of any legal professional involved in the transaction.

In all, a closing should be a fairly smooth process. By the time the closing is scheduled and paperwork ready, all issues and questions would have been thoroughly uncovered and addressed. Other than the essential parties listed above, the others have satisfactorily completed their job so that the transaction can proceed without their presence at the closing table.

Principle Abstract is committed to representing the needs of the buyer. If you are interested in buying a home or refinancing, visit our website or give our office a call and a member of our team will be happy to answer any questions you have.

How to Maintain Privacy on Public Land Records

Sales involving property become part of public record. The deed that is recorded with a town and/or county becomes information that sits within public domain. In other words, virtually anyone can quite easily search for your property, either online or in a hall of records where such documents are kept and find your name, eliminating privacy.

Some situations arise where homebuyers require that their names are kept off record. The reasons can be quite varied and while not common, it is something that becomes a necessity during a real estate transactions.

There are several routes that a real estate buyer can take to ensure privacy is maintained on a purchase. In this blog, we explore some of them.

Revocable Trust

According to Investopedia, a revocable trust is a ‘part of estate planning that manages and protects the assets of the grantor as the owner ages.’

By vesting a title within a revocable trust, homeowners can achieve privacy in a pragmatic way. Most homeowners need financing, and revocable trusts can obtain financing from a lender. The result is a home sale where the trust is listed as the buyer rather than the names of the parties that the trust pertains to.

Limited Liability Company

It is possible to purchase property through a limited liability company (LLC.) to preserve privacy. This is not very common, however, since it is harder to secure a loan as an LLC and most home buyers require financing. The caveat here is if the transaction is being handled in cash where financing has been removed from the equation or if the property at hand is commercial property.

Realty Trust

Realty trusts are another tool that buyers can use as a way to purchase real estate privately. They are quite similar to LLCs in that they are mainly used as part of a cash transaction or by commercial property buyers (including buyers interested in rental units.) Like LLCs, realty trusts can also have difficulty securing financing. If a buyer is solely interested in privacy, it is unlikely this will be the preferred route to maintain privacy.

No matter your reason for privacy and how you decide to proceed, it is essential to seek the advice of an accountant and seek legal counsel. No decision should be taken without deep consideration and consultation with professionals to ensure you are proceeding in a way that preserves your best interests. Not doing so may result in serious legal, financial and/or tax consequences.

Principle Abstract is one of the area’s most trusted title insurance providers and conduct each transaction with the interests of the buyer in mind. If privacy is a priority to you on an upcoming real estate transaction, give our office a call and a member of our team will be happy to assist you.

Ready to get started? Give our office a call today.

4.5 Things You Need for a Virtual Closing

The pandemic has unquestionably changed the way we work, travel and shop. It has also changed the way we purchase homes. Over these many months, the real estate industry has also had to adapt to a new way of working. As pandemic restrictions subside, many of these adaptations remain, largely for the better. This includes virtual closings.

Traditionally, closings were in person at a mutually agreed upon location and all documentation prepared for the closing would be reviewed and signed by the present parties, whether it be a property transaction or a refinance.

Virtual closings have now become more normal, allowing the necessary parties to log in from virtually anywhere to navigate the closing process both quickly and securely.

If you are a homeowner and will be conducting a closing virtually, or you’re a real estate agent assisting a buyer with a virtual closing, these tips will come in handy as the day approaches.

Devices

You should choose a device that will allow you to view documents clearly, and also has a working camera and microphone. Most folks will leverage an iPad or other form of laptop for their closing as well as a desktop if they have the camera and microphone set up.

Smartphones may be suitable, but the screen size can make things hard to read and cumbersome. Try and avoid reliance on your smartphone on closing day.

Additionally, ensure that the audio and video functions are working and/or enabled and ready to go for closing day. Most devices have privacy settings that you can enable leading up to the time of your closing to help move things along. Last minute tech issues can add unnecessary frustration and anxiety that can be easily avoided.

Wi-Fi

Closings have a lot of steps and unreliably internet, lagging, and spotty audio can really slow things down and create opportunities to miss information.

Ensure you are at a location with a reliably strong and fast internet connection. The programs used to stream closings, as well as screen sharing and video, can take up quite a bit of bandwidth. Try and avoid public wi-fi which is often inconsistent and not as fast as a home connection. Also try and disconnect any other devices that use up internet bandwidth.

Paperwork

Always ensure you have identification on hand in the event that it is required. You should also have any documentation you have that has been generated in the lead up to your meeting available or already open on your device for quick reference. This will help speed things along and allow for a smooth transaction.

Atmosphere

Come settlement day, ensure that you have access to quiet space to ensure there are no distractions or issues hearing the proceedings. If you have pets or children, do your best (believe us, we understand both can be loud and unpredictable!) but try and control what you can, such as outside noise, music/tv in the background, etc.

You will also need to be prepared to be on camera. With this in mind, consider attire and background for your closing that meet your own expectations. In other words, don’t be caught off guard and suddenly feel compelled to change and/or tidy up at the beginning of the meeting. Simply come prepared and comfortable with your appearance/surroundings.

Celebrate

Be prepared to celebrate! In most cases, a real estate transaction is a big milestone. Just because you are not physically out signing your paperwork doesn’t mean you can’t toast your accomplishment. Many folks opt to head out for a round of drinks and/or dinner after a home purchase or race over to their new property with a bottle of champagne. And you certainly can! Whatever you decide to do to celebrate, don’t let a virtual closing take that away from you.

Principle Abstract has been conducting virtual closings along with in person closings throughout the pandemic and see them as part of the norm going forward.

If you have any questions about virtual closings or wish to get started on a real estate transaction or refinance, contact our office today and a member of our staff will be able to assist you.

Why Your Closing Date Makes a Big Difference

There are countless steps in a home purchase or a refinance that folks need to navigate. By the time the topic of a closing date comes up, it’s easy to succumb to fatigue or anxiety and just confirm the first available date to get it over with.

Yet your closing date is quite important and can impact the entire closing experience both financially and administratively.

Should I Close on a Friday?

Fridays are typically the most sought-after date for a close. Work tends to be lighter that day, and many opt to take the day off to celebrate, spend time in their new home (if they are purchasing,) and to give themselves a 3-day weekend.

Yet Friday can come with significant delays. For the reasons stated above, there are typically more Friday closings than on any other day of the week, which means that title companies and lenders alike are busy with paperwork, closing the books on all the transactions at hand, etc. If there are any delays, it’s likely your closing will get pushed through the weekend and into the following week.

This is likely not ideal if you have prepared for an on time closing by requested time off from work, move, made plans to meet with contractors, etc. It’s worth trying to make a mid-week close work and allow some buffer time between your closing and your first big weekend with your property.

If you do need to close on a Friday, voice your desire to close early in the day. If any issues arise with walk-throughs, etc., there is still time in the day to get the closing accomplished. Additionally, giving the balance of the day for title agents and lenders to carry out wire transfers and the like will additionally speed things up.

Avoid the Last Few Days of the Month

For several strategic reasons, it’s smart to close well before the end of the month. For one, a purchaser pays interest in advance for the balance of the month, so the cash to close figure remains lower in the earlier days of the month.

Another reason to eye a closing earlier in the month is that buyers typically skip that first month’s payment. This can come as a relief to many who can take a breath after a large transaction, allow the dust to settle, and recover some cash that would otherwise go towards your mortgage payment.

It also takes some time for lenders to send out information/welcome packets, instructions on how to pay that first payment, etc. This allows for a more relaxed transition with plenty of time to get acquainted with your new lender.

Principle Abstract and Settlement Services works with each of our clients to ensure a smooth transaction, but also a well informed one. If you have questions or goals concerning your closing date, feel free to ask and we can work towards it. At the end of the day, all parties involved want a smooth, on-time transaction. We will do everything we can to ensure that happens but also let you know of any issues that come along which may impact that goal.

Interested in learning more or have a home purchase or refinance you are working on? Contact us today and a member of our team will be happy to speak with you.

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